Walls and Malls

16Oct13

Last week I was promoting our new business venture at a conference in the pleasant city of York, at a mediocre hotel overlooking the river just a hundred metres from a former workplace of mine.

Today Twitter, on our business feed, has presented me with a ‘promoted’ suggestion to “Invest in Perth”, Scotland’s newest city and another former workplace of mine.

It seems that my working life continues to follow some well-worn ruts.

I decided to follow @investinperth anyway. It is a very nice place and I did help open the wonderful concert hall there a few years ago, so I’d like to go back and see how it’s doing one day, although I’m not sure that the scale of our business will be sufficient to get @investinperth tweeting happily.

Whilst in York my colleague asked me why the city walls were in such good condition compared to the crumbling and incomplete city walls of Norwich.

I had to confess that I didn’t know. Is it because York was actively using its walls for defence for a couple of hundred years longer than Norwich? Or is it because the citizens of Norwich couldn’t be bothered to look very far for building materials and plundered the walls to build mobile phone shops and glittering malls? (York seemed relatively poorly provided with glittering malls). I was able to recall that the York city walls weigh 100,000 tonnes, slightly more than half a tonne per citizen, which is always a useful fact.

Does Perth have a city wall? Glittering malls? Is this an investment opportunity?

Advertisements


3 Responses to “Walls and Malls”

  1. 1 Graham

    The City walls around Norwich were funded by it’s inhabitants so whilst it was very noble of them, they didn’t really have the funds to complete the walls to a high standard. The york wall was built a few hundred year later and the construction is very different and far more sturdy, the current York wall was never really tested by attack so remains almost undesturbed since the day of construction.

  2. I think the York walls were then rebuilt as a tourist attraction by some early victorians. Definitely cheating…


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: